Of signatures and agents

I am all spectacularly delighted to announce that my novel, Of Falls and Angela, is now represented by Leslie Gardner at Artellus.

2016, it seems, will be a year of exciting things. It’s barely two weeks old and I’m already squandering my year’s allowance of exclamation marks. You get four a year, remember. Watch this wanton extravagance:

I’VE GOT AN AGENT!!!!

Data Riker Picard carThat’s me committed to 12 months of modest expression. Totally worth it.

We’ve been working together on the manuscript for a while now and it’s feeling much, much stronger for it. Editing is arguably a game of diminishing returns on effort, with the final improvements being disproportionately hard to achieve. I’m talking about the fine-tuning here, the polish and sheen, when you nail that alchemical something – the last few per cent. And working with Leslie has made those last steps possible. I’ve been asked more astute and complex-to-answer questions about my writing in the last few months than ever before. I love it.

So here’s to 2016, and I’ll let you know any more exciting developments as soon as I can.

How to Get a Literary Agent – LBF 2013 seminar

I just came across this recording of one of the London Book Fair sessions, entitled How to Get a Literary Agent. It’s really worth a watch if you’re aiming at a career as a writer but you don’t already work in publishing.

A lot of it is familiar to tired old hacks such as myself because it applies to any publishing project. But if you’re not used to thinking about the entire product – for instance considering the life cycle from manuscript to sales/marketing – and have mainly been focused on the writing to date you should watch. Remember, publishing is a business. There’s a point about 17-18mins in where they mention a rejection along the lines of:

Best book I’ve read in 6 months. Loved it. Can’t sell it.